Winter squash & black beluga lentils make some fine Halloween veggie burgers

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I’m not going to wax poetic about these veggie burgers.  I’ll let them speak for themselves.  But I WILL say that you ought to give them a try.  I really dressed mine up with the chipotle & dried cranberry coleslaw I made to go with them, as well as some dill pickle, Swiss chard or beet greens, fresh tomato slices and some candied jalapenos (they are so good!) that my friend made this summer.  I’ll post the recipe soon!  Til then, here’s a crazy Halloween video, with plenty of outakes at the end, on how to make the burgers and slaw.

Upcoming recipe: winter squash & beluga lentil burgers + chipotle coleslaw

What’s the point of this post?  To get you excited about next week’s CSA share and help you prep your pantry & fridge for items on this coming week’s tremendously exciting menu!

It is winter squash season, so we’ll be getting a different winter squash every week.  This week we got ‘Fairy’ winter squash, which I have yet to use, but I plan to make good use of it this weekend.  Next week we’ll try another variety (maybe ‘Lower Salmon’ or ‘Kabocha’) and I’ll put it to use in this veggie burger recipe with some black beluga lentils.  So what’s on the menu?

Winter squash & beluga lentil veggie burgers with homemade hamburger buns.  Chipotle coleslaw.  Roasted baby carrots & baby beets.

I don’t know about you, but I am EXCITED about this upcoming meal.  And if all goes according to plan, we’ll get most of the ingredients with next week’s share.  Nearly all of the remaining ingredients we’ve gotten in previous shares, which means nearly 100% of this meal will be made with locally sourced ingredients.  Yay!  Wanna make these burgers?  And/or the coleslaw?  Here’s what you’ll need:

For the burgers:

Winter squash (this & next week’s share)

black beluga lentils (next week’s share) -OR- other lentils/pulses/grain of your choice

smoked Monterrey Jack cheese –OR-cheese of your choice

parsley (this week’s share)

thyme

onion (recent shares)

oatmeal

eggs

cornmeal

For the coleslaw:

cabbage (next week’s share)

celeriac, also known as celery root (next week’s share)

carrots (recent shares & next week’s share)

watermelon radish (this week’s share & next week for those who didn’t get theirs)

dried cranberries

chipotle pepper (dried or canned in adobo sauce)

I’m really hopeful we get everything we order so I can make this meal.  If we don’t, oh well, that’s how the baby beets roll this time of year in Montana.  I’m also hoping to acquire some arugula in next week’s share to serve on top of the burgers, along with some sliced tomatoes that we got in this week’s share.  And I’ll make some chipotle mayo to slather on the buns as well.  Of course, I’ll make a video to show you how to throw it all together, too!  It will be fun!  ‘Til next week, dream of warm winter squash-based meals!

 

 

 

The crazy food preservation day: How to cold smoke cheese (and almonds)

I nearly worked myself into a frenzy after last night’s post thinking about all the things I need to get done before I leave for an out-of-state conference in just over a week.  There’s so much to do!  But I am happy to say that after a full day in the kitchen, I managed to knock out a lot of the food preservation that needed to happen this weekend.  I smoked a ton of cheese (and almonds!), and shot the video (see below).  I also dealt with all those pears and made some pear preserves.  Sadly, some of the pears were beginning to rot.  The good news in all that, though, is 1) I was actually relieved I didn’t have to deal with the entire lot of pears and 2) the chickens benefited tremendously from eating those rotting pears–they were some happy girls!  I also made some pizza dough (for tomorrow night’s dinner) and garlic scape pesto–to be used on the pizza dough that is tomorrow night’s dinner.  Granted, my feet and legs were achy by the end of the day, and I was so tired that I only ate popcorn for dinner, but it was a very good, productive day at the urban farmstead!

Now, about the cheese and almonds…

If you’ve never smoked your own cheese and almonds, my friends, it is high time you consider doing it.  It’s so easy!

Smoking cheese is done via a cold smoking process, which means you do not add any heat while the cheese is exposed to the smoke, unlike smoking meats which is usually done over heat so that the meat cooks while it smokes.  There are a variety of ways to cold smoke, but I use a 12″ tube smoker that holds wood pellets, and I simply set it on the rack in my BBQ grill.  You can see in the video how easy it is to set up your grill as a smoker.  One thing you have to keep in mind while smoking cheese: outside air temperature–if it is warm, say 80 or 90 degrees F, your cheese will melt.  Smoking cheese is best done on a cool day (40 – 60 degrees is optimal).  Even if it is not hot enough outside to melt your cheese, if it is too warm, all the oils will sweat out of the cheese and pool on the surface of your cheese blocks, similar to how the oil pools on top of your pizza cheese.  This is no bueno.  So only smoke your cheese on a nice, cool day, preferably out of direct sunlight, too (the added heat from the sunlight could cause your cheese to sweat and/or melt).

Smoking cheese takes some time, so allow 4-5 hours for the process.  I typically smoke my cheese for 3-4 hours, and I flip my cheese over halfway through so that the smoke coloration and flavor is evenly distributed on my cheese blocks.  I have been using apple wood as my smoke flavor, but there are lots of options out there: cherry, mesquite, hickory, oak, alder, pecan…the list goes on.  Here are a couple of references that can inform you on which wood you choose: a chart and a blog.

Once your cheese has been smoked, it needs to cure for a few weeks in order to temper the smoked flavor and also to allow it time to work its way deep into the cheese.  In order to do this, and to keep your cheese from spoiling, you’ll need to vacuum pack your cheese.  The vacuum sealer is just one other tool that I use heavily in my food preservation regimen, so if you don’t have one, it’s something to consider.  I only recently–within the last year or two–added a vacuum sealer to my fleet of kitchen tools.  But I love it and I use it regularly.  And if you don’t need a lot of bells and whistles, they aren’t all that expensive, either.

Smoking almonds isn’t quite the process as cheese, because you don’t have to let them cure afterwards–you can pop them right into your mouth once they cool!  Almonds don’t have to be cold smoked, but I do it this way because it makes sense to me to use the smoke as efficiently as possible, and I have the space on my grill to do it.  Before smoking almonds, you will want to soak them for a few minutes in a fairly strong brine solution.  Today I used 3 cups almonds in 3 cups water with 3 teaspoons of salt.  Let the almonds soak for 10 or 15 minutes, then drain the brine and spread the almonds on a baking sheet.  After cold smoking, you will need to put the almonds in a low oven to dry out completely because they will still be damp after smoking (this will make your house smell like smoke a little bit).  In the video I used 250 degrees F, but that wasn’t quite hot enough.  In the past I have used 325 degrees F and that was perfect (I just forgot that today).  Stick the baking sheet in the oven for 10 minutes, then stir the almonds around.  You might hear the skins cracking and popping a bit–it sounds like Rice Krispies once you’ve added the milk–and put them back in the oven for another 10 minutes.  Then remove the almonds from the oven and allow them to cool completely on the baking sheet.  They will continue to crackle and pop while they dry and that is exactly what you want to hear!  Once they are completely cooled you can pop them in your mouth.  To store, put them in an airtight container and keep them at room temperature.  If it is going to be a while before you eat the almonds, you can vacuum seal them to keep them from going stale.

For all the gnarly details on smoking cheese (and almonds!), check out this video:

 

It’s that time of year again—the preservation season is upon us

This is one of the busiest times of the gardening season.  Right now, it is raining/snowing outside and my garden season is essentially over.  What the deer (or my little rascal, MaeBelle) didn’t eat of my tomatoes and other veggies, I have harvested and either eaten or frozen or dried or canned in some form.  In a way, it’s a relief to be finished with my own garden right now so I can focus on other things for a while.  Garlic-planting is still to come—but not until late October.  The summer CSA is still going strong for another 4 weeks, then our fall share will begin immediately afterwards and take us through Thanksgiving—so I’ve still got over 2 full months of fresh produce coming my way.  So between the CSA, what I’ve harvested out of my own garden, and what my neighbors have given me, I’ve been busily preserving all sorts of foods for the past few weeks so I can enjoy them this winter and early next spring.

Since my tomatoes were nearly a complete bust this year I bought a 10 lb box of cherry tomatoes to eat and preserve.

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This is maybe half of the 10 lbs left to eat & preserve–what beautiful little jewels!

I ended up drying 2/3 or more of the tomatoes because I absolutely love dried tomatoes and I use them all winter long for my tomato fix.  And drying tomatoes is so easy AND economical!  I cannot purchase sun-dried tomatoes at the supermarket.  First of all, I don’t really like the oil-packed ones, and secondly, they are insanely expensive.  If you have a food dehydrator (and if you don’t have a food dehydrator, you should seriously consider getting one if you want to preserve food) you can make your own dried tomatoes for pennies compared to those expensive jars in the grocery store.

I simply cut my cherry tomatoes into halves or thirds, depending on how large the tomato was, placed them onto the dehydrator trays, stacked them up (I have 4 trays), placed the lid on top, plugged in the dehydrator, and walked away.

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All cut up and ready to dry, cap’n!
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I’ve had this dehydrator for YEARS, and I love it!  They still make it and it’s very inexpensive.

Some of them dried overnight, others I had to dry a little longer because they were still a little too juicy.  I dry mine until they are leathery, with just a little bit of give to them when you bend them.  Because there is still moisture in the tomato, they are not shelf stable—meaning you can’t store them at room temperature or you risk spoilage via mold and/or bacteria.  So I toss mine into a plastic zippered baggie and store them in the freezer.  When I want to add that little sweet spark of dried tomato to a dish, I just reach into the bag and pull out however many I want.  Easy peasy!  Sometimes I re-hydrate the tomatoes by putting them in a small glass bowl with a little bit of boiling water, sometimes I just chop them up and add them to whatever dish I’m preparing.  It varies depending on the dish and, more often, my mood.  If you preserve no other food in your house, and you like dried tomatoes, you should seriously consider making your own.

For the remaining 1/3 of the tomatoes, some I used to make a balsamic vinegar caramelized onion & cherry tomato conserve a few weeks ago that was beyond words yummy on a slice of bread with some cream cheese.  And I simply ate a ton of them—just popped them in my mouth most of the time, though I did get on a kick of making this awesome cherry tomato, cucumber, mozzarella cheese, basil, and balsamic vinaigrette salad for a week or two.  Sweet, tart, tangy, cheesy, herby—oh, it was so good!  That’s the stuff summer is made of.  I will miss that salad in January, but I know I’ll be able to enjoy it again next summer with fresh, locally grown veggies & herbs…and that the wait will be well worth it (because I know damn well if I make it in January with a cucumber and tomatoes from the supermarket I will hate myself because it will have absolutely no flavor—so no giving in!).

Last weekend I made some plum & blueberry preserves.  This weekend I’ve got several things on my plate.  I need to make some pear preserves with the 10 pounds of pears my neighbor gave me, I need to smoke the backlog of cheese I have in the fridge (this week’s video!), and I need to make garlic scape pesto from those garlic scapes I harvested waaaaaay back in early summer and have been sitting in my fridge, patiently waiting for me to make time for pesto.  It will happen this weekend.  It has to happen this weekend because I’ve got the next 4 or 5 weekends booked up with work, festivals, travel plans, in-laws visiting, (rifle) hunting season beginning, and finishing the fence, among other things.  I also need to render some more lard (more on that in another post) to clean out the freezer in preparation for hunting season—right now, we have no space to put any meat!  But that will have to wait until late October as well.

No rest for the weary this time of year.  But you know what?  When I slather a spoonful of pear preserves onto a biscuit this winter or sprinkle some chopped dried tomatoes on my pizza I’m going to be so glad that I put the time in to preserve this bounty of food that I am incredibly fortunate to have.

Parsnip muffins–yes, you can

Parsnips.  In a muffin?  Seriously.  If you are one of those people who cringe when you see parsnips in your CSA share…well, listen up because I’ve got a sweet deal for you.  These muffins totally rock.  They are moist.  They are just sweet enough.  They have a hint of lemon.  And if you don’t really like parsnips, that’s the best part–you can’t taste them!  My version is a hack on a recipe I found in a Baker Creek Heirloom Seed catalog from way back when.  Their version is vegan–and you can certainly re-veganize this recipe by using an egg substitute of your choice.  You will love these.  Check out the recipe and see for yourself.

 

This is no grocery store potato salad

This potato salad is covered in a tangy Dijon vinaigrette!  In short: make this.  You won’t regret it.  Bonus: it’s really quick to throw together–great for potlucks and parties. Recipe is here.  Enjoy!

More ideas for using tomatillos!

My friend Patty sent me this recipe for tomatillo salsa tonight.  It sounds really yummy, so I may have to try this.  Note to self: add avocado to the grocery list….

I do not know where she got this recipe, but here it is.  Enjoy!

Ingredients

  • 1 Pound Fresh Peeled and Washed Tomatillos

  • 1/2 Bunch of Fresh Cilantro

  • 2-3 Cloves of Peeled Garlic

  • 1 Fresh Jalapeño

  • 1 Medium Avocado

  • Juice of 1 Lime
  • Salt to taste

Directions

  1. Peel tomatillos, clean, and quarter.

  2. Add tomatillos to blender and blend to reduce.

  3. Add cilantro, garlic, jalapeño, avocado, and lime juice to blender. Blend to preferred consistency and salt to taste.
  4. Enjoy!

Chili verde (It’s so hot)!

Oh my goodness, I’m feeling like a roasted chili these days.  It is hot in Montana this summer!  It’s hot outside, it’s hot inside my house, this chili is hot…not spicy hot (unless you want it that way–the go for it!), just hot off the stove hot.  I probably should have made a salad for this week’s video or something like that, but you know tomatillos don’t last forever in Montana, so as the old saying goes: You gotta make hay while the sun is shining.

So I made some stinkin’ chili verde!  And you know what?  It is GOOOOOOOOD!  It’s even better for lunch the next day.  So get on the tomatillo and chili bandwagon with me and make yourself some.  Don’t want to eat it all?  It will freeze!  Then you can enjoy when you really DO want something hot to eat.  Here’s the recipe, and the video is below.  It may be hot in the kitchen, but you’ll enjoy this one!

Spice up your day with a little eggplant curry

It should come as no surprise that I love food of all kinds, but I particularly love curries.  I love the way the simple act of combining 7 or 8 spices into an exotic mixture carries the aroma of far away places to my kitchen.  Since I can’t travel to India right now, I’ll settle for a little taste of India at my dining room table right here in Montana.  Plus, it’s a great way to use the CSA share this week!  Want the recipe?  It’s here.  And for even more fun check out the video: